Invention vs. Innovation

By Rachel McLaughlin

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/boegh/6085347780/in/photolist-agJZTj-fEKA4t-fpmM79-bHVP3-33BVoG-kMbom-7Efwam-8S83NL-px8hdd-7KbCQT-rpuW5A-dnf1dp-c2iCA-7pqdLo-8VBTUM-7zpr87-6RatpM-5XRNJC-8mxeRr-9Twsrz-daGT9K-eeigiy-97apYs-8z476d-99UsVX-9uU28Q-CWBqU-hJwAag-8S4Xon-e1UW7Z-7Efwjw-8mAPA3-8mxD1n-cudfXE-8mCcC7-8mw7NB-8eKnR1-daGVHL-nK58or-8myAUB-8mxvo6-99UsZc-8myjXx-e4yvdi-gngvtN-daGTdT-hJwzGd-cudfLE-CDNpP-4YBH5i     The difference between a business owner and a successful business owner is innovation. First, you need to create an idea. Anyone can have an invention, a unique product or method, but innovation “breaks through” into the (economic) market and makes an impact on society. Many business owners are usually innovative without awareness; it’s simply just how the owner works.

     Anyone can create an idea or product, device, process, or use someone else’s, but the difference is making those inventions effective. Effective innovations typically do the most amount of work for the least cost while ensuring client (and owner) satisfaction.

     Small businesses, unlike large, have clear metrics and have the ability to change their direction with their course of work. Working with customer problems provides small businesses a great chance at innovation.

CCLG, LLC would like to give a special thanks to Rachel McLaughlin for writing this blog post.

Posted in Small Business.

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